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There is a one in 1,461 chance that a person will be born on a Leap Day.
There is a one in 1,461 chance that a person will be born on a Leap Day. / Carl Weiss

The quadrennially celebrated Leap Day keeps seasons timely and calendars precise, is an excuse for women to propose marriage, or is simply an extra day to enjoy.

“Julius Caesar first adopted the Leap Day concept from the Egyptians,” says Yury Grabovsky, math professor at Temple University.“ He figured out he could make a precise calendar by adding a day every four years. Precision was very important because if you planted seeds at the wrong time of year, you might have famine on your hands.”

Peter Brouwer, founder of the “Honor Society of Leap Year Day Babies,” which holds a membership of 9,000 “Leapsters,” says people should take Leap Day to reflect on their lives and do something special. “Open your doors to your neighbors or some kind of goodwill for the day,” Brouwer says. “It could be devoted to the Earth, because it really is all about the Earth and how long it takes to spin on its axis.”

More fun facts about Leap Day:

What are the chances? There is a one in 1,461 chance that a person will be born on a Leap Day.

Forever young. “Leapsters” will never have a “Golden Birthday.” Leap Day babies would have to be 116 before they turn 29 on the 29th.

Get it in writing. When a baby is born on Leap Day, physicians will often ask the parents to choose either Feb. 28 or March 1 for the birth certificate.

Check out leapyearday.com for more fun facts.

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